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How to promote and sell your Art

Having spent many years learning the pitfalls and Highs of selling my work here are a few tips that might help you if you are ready to pursue your dream and learn how to sell your art. You want to take your hobby to the next level then you must learn like any professional the tools of your trades. Becoming a professional artist is not for the faint hearted so learn how to navigate the legal, technical and social elements with our art career columns and articles. Knowing how to make the best impression on such a site will help you introduce an audience to who you are as a professional artist, what you specialize in and how people can buy your work. To make the most of your time online, use these tips for turning social networking into new sales.How to promote and sell your Art Having spent many years learning the pitfalls and Highs of selling my work here are a few tips that might help you if you are ready to pursue your dream and learn how to sell your art. You want to take your hobby to the next level then you must learn like any professional the tools of your trades. Becoming a professional artist is not for the faint hearted so learn how to navigate the legal, technical and social elements with our art career columns and articles. Knowing how to make the best impression on such a site will help you introduce an audience to who you are as a professional artist, what you specialize in and how people can buy your work. To make the most of your time online, use these tips for turning social networking into new sales..
How To Approach Galleries Just as the gallery has to know its clientele, an artist must know His or her audience, and that includes researching diligently everything about each gallery you wish to approach. Present your credentials-shows, awards and biographical material; then make certain your images look professionally prepared, whether in photographs, slides or digital form You Approach a Top Gallery Make sure you’ve achieved some professional success as an artist. In your portfolio, include information about your past one-person exhibitions, as well as lists of people and corporations that have bought your work. Have professional-quality digital images, photographs, transparencies or slides taken of your best work. Most new artists think, art galleries do want to look at new artists’ artworks. But understandably most art galleries want to be able to do this on their terms, on their time schedule and in their own way How do I get my artwork into art galleries?  there is no set formula in how to approach an art gallery, but I can  guide you in your endeavours The major mistake that I see artists make is that they will be so desperate to get their work shown that they waste a lot of time approaching and making contact with the wrong art galleries. By this I mean, that the artist is soliciting any and all art galleries without first determining whether their art is compatible and in keeping with that gallery’s inventory. So it pays to do a certain amount of research on the targeted gallery prior to approaching them  The artist should objectively evaluate the gallery whether they are a good fit with their art, style, media, pricing why waste your time and also the gallery’s time trying to get an appointment when your work just doesn't fit the galleries style  Today, there is enough information online that will allow the artist to make a reasonable assessment on whether that gallery is a good prospect for your art.  Many times the gallery website will provide their submission policy or submission parameters and requirements. In some cases, they will say that they are not reviewing any portfolios at this time. This means that at this time, the gallery is satisfied with their current artists and that they are too busy to stop and review art portfolios. Please respect this and do not bother the gallery. However, if a gallery has not provided their submission policy publicly, then a short note or a concise email asking what their present submission policy will suffice. Many art galleries schedule a certain time of the year or a time of the month when they will review portfolios, as this is much easier and more efficient to review art portfolios at the same time. Again, an artist should follow their procedure and schedule exactly as it states. To do anything else, will risk the artist, for being remembered by the gallery for the wrong reasons! What to do when you have secured an appointment with a gallery Make sure that your biography, CV and artist statement are up to date. Have extra copies too. Have all images of your artwork prepared in several forms for the gallery to review. Make sure that you have extra copies of this work in order to be able to leave them at the gallery for further review. There is nothing worse for an artist to say to the gallery, that this is their only set and that they have to take it with them. Don’t do it. Make sure that the images of your artwork is professionally presentable. use  professional photographer experienced in photographing fine art yes it can be expensive but it will pay off in the long run  Act professionally. Think of this gallery appointment as you would if you were applying for a job and the employer was interviewing you. The gallery will have questions about your background, experience and your art. Conversely, you should be prepared to discuss how they conduct their gallery business and if you were to be selected, how could their arrangements help to sell your art? Be patient be  prepared to wait, for a decision on their behalf about taking you on as a gallery artist. In many cases, art galleries are working a year or two out with the scheduling of their shows and exhibitions. So be prepared to wait and be patient. But Conversely, be prepared to act quickly The best ways to meet gallery directors/owners to discuss your art is through the introduction by other artists who have shown their art at the gallery. This approach is much better than a “cold call” and it is also a form of a “third party endorsement of your work. This is another reason why it is important to network and be a part of local art organizations Think locally and branch out from there. Get known locally prior to approaching art galleries in larger cities. Try to get into local galleries through art competitions and art shows, and then build upon that success into regional, state and nationa gallieries. How to market & Sell your artwork on social Networking sites How to Start First thing to understand the chances of getting rich are very slim "Starving Artist" comes to mind  but its possible. You will need a e-mail address to get visit the most frequently used social networking sites. With more than 150 million members worldwide, Facebook is a premier spot where artists and other creative people promote there work. MySpace, Flickr is a photo-hosting site that many artists. All of the sites allow you to post the latest news about your life and work, share photos and keep in touch with your ever-growing circle of  potential purchasers LinkedIn is  the most business oriented of all the social-networking sites and a good place to meet other professionals in a similar field. Twitter is a growing online network focused around micro blogging  quick update service where users are limited number of characters per update. First Create a winning profile make your profile comprehensive & Sing Provide links to more information about yourself, website, art-related awards you’ve received, your blog,  galleries of your work, galleries that feature your work, and articles written about you. In addition to providing loads of links, to make your pitch about your artistic passion .”Upload  lots of examples of your best work. Let people get a clear idea of your work within the social networking site itself. Creating a portfolio of available artwork including details and prices. Letting visitors know how to purchase your work  such as ecwid  Fineartamerica etc,, which provided Shopping widgets that can be installed into your social media and websites are essential to turning passive visitors into active buyers. Build your Network build up your list of contacts LinkedIn, MySpace, Facebook, Flickr and even Twitter (to a lesser extent) all have well-defined groups you can join, where like-minded people exchange views and ideas .  Host an online events Want to create your own online art event? In Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace, you can easily create an event and then promote the happening to your network of friends, family, potential clients and anyone else who would be interested. Promote your events let people know about upcoming, open studios & exhibitions Social media literacy is an essential skill for all artists to master.being able to effectively use social media to self-promote and create a lasting, active community that will continue to support you.When using any social media tool, there some important rules to follow:  Don’t lead with tools, lead with relationships. You aren’t going to get anywhere by blindly twittering promotional material 20 times a day.  In fact, that’s probably a pretty good way to annoy your fans.  Instead of looking at these tools as a platform solely for spewing content, think of them as a way to get involved in the conversation of your community. Use tools as an aide to build community. When you are an artist, community is everything.  It is your bread and butter and if your fans are not strong and loyal, you will not survive.  You do not have to be a household name to be successful if you have a strong community. Tell your story. You want to use social media to connect and engage with your audience on a personal level. People remember stories, so why not tell yours?  And I don’t mean a stale bio that you find on all these artists’ websites.  I mean something personal, written by you, about you, that readers will want to tell other people.  One interesting and memorable anecdote or fact makes it easier for your fans to promote you.  Create an incentive for users to come back. Make your fans feel special and give them something they can’t get anywhere else. . Building community, making a personal connection, and actively engaging your audience is not only important, it is necessary to set yourself apart from everybody else. Be authentic and be yours How to market & Sell your artwork on social Networking sites How to Start You will need a e-mail address to get visit the most frequently used social networking sites. With more than 150 million members worldwide, Facebook is a premier spot where artists and other creative people promote there work. MySpace, Flickr is a photo-hosting site that many artists. All of the sites allow you to post the latest news about your life and work, share photos and keep in touch with your ever-growing circle of  potential purchasers LinkedIn is  the most business oriented of all the social-networking sites and a good place to meet other professionals in a similar field. Twitter is a growing online network focused around micro blogging  quick update service where users are limited number of characters per update. First Create a winning profile make your profile comprehensive & Sing Provide links to more information about yourself, website, art-related awards you’ve received, your blog,  galleries of your work, galleries that feature your work, and articles written about you. In addition to providing loads of links, to make your pitch about your artistic passion .”Upload  lots of examples of your best work. Let people get a clear idea of your work within the social networking site itself. Creating a portfolio of available artwork including details and prices. Letting visitors know how to purchase your work such as a ECWID, Fine art America which provided Shopping widgets that can be installed into your social media and websites are essential to turning passive visitors into active buyers. Build your Network build up your list of contacts LinkedIn, MySpace, Facebook, Flickr and even Twitter (to a lesser extent) all have well-defined groups you can join, where like-minded people exchange views and ideas .  Host an online events Want to create your own online art event? In Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace, you can easily create an event and then promote the happening to your network of friends, family, potential clients and anyone else who would be interested. Promote your events let people know about upcoming, open studios & exhibitions Social media literacy is an essential skill for all artists to master.being able to effectively use social media to self-promote and create a lasting, active community that will continue to support you.When using any social media tool, there some important rules to follow:  Don’t lead with tools, lead with relationships. You aren’t going to get anywhere by blindly twittering promotional material 20 times a day.  In fact, that’s probably a pretty good way to annoy your fans.  Instead of looking at these tools as a platform solely for spewing content, think of them as a way to get involved in the conversation of your community. Use tools as an aide to build community. When you are an artist, community is everything.  It is your bread and butter and if your fans are not strong and loyal, you will not survive.  You do not have to be a household name to be successful if you have a strong community. Tell your story. You want to use social media to connect and engage with your audience on a personal level. People remember stories, so why not tell yours?  And I don’t mean a stale bio that you find on all these artists’ websites.  I mean something personal, written by you, about you, that readers will want to tell other people.  One interesting and memorable anecdote or fact makes it easier for your fans to promote you.  Create an incentive for users to come back. Make your fans feel special and give them something they can’t get anywhere else. . Building community, making a personal connection, and actively engaging your audience is not only important, it is necessary to set yourself apart from everybody else. Be authentic and be yourself. How to Apply for Art and Artist Grants, Information of grants may change overtime.Generating funding for art is always challenging,  The good news is that the art world is one place where anyone who shows talent and promise, marketable or otherwise, can get help in a variety of ways including cash grants, residencies, employment or internships, allowances, free or low-cost studio space, art supplies, exhibition space, and so on. Receiving these types of assistance is not easy; application processes can be rigorous and competition is often intense. So in the interest of giving you a bit of an edge in situations where you're contending for a bequest, here's a brief tutorial on realize your dreams.  To begin with, be clear and focused about your intentions and goals,   Assuming you've got your agenda together and have identified potential opportunities, the most important part of any request for assistance is the application process. For starters, read the instructions thoroughly is it critical to understand and complete all forms according to instructions, Be aware that you can sometimes apply for a grant or other form of assistance based only on an idea. In fact, certain organizations prefer funding innovative concepts for producing art that does not yet exist rather than supporting art that already exists, but at the same time, they still require that whatever you propose to do be either based on or supported by the merits of previous work. In general, an organization financing an idea has to have trust in the artist based on some sort of established track record of accomplishments, which in addition to completed work, may include a resume, list of shows or exhibitions, previous awards or grants, and so on-- assuming they're relevant to whatever is being applied for.  filling out the application itself, spelling, neatness, good grammar, following word count requirements, and thoroughness are all important  here are a few funding organisations: The Elephant Trust address  512 Bankside Lofts, 65 Hopton Street London SE1 9GZ   contact  Ruth Rattenbury   email  ruth@elephanttrust.org.uk   website  http://www.elephanttrust.org.uk The Trust was set up in 1975 to make it possible for artists and those presenting their work to undertake and complete projects when frustrated by lack of funds. It is committed to helping artists and art institutions/galleries that depart from the routine and signal new, distinct and imaginative sets of possibilities. The Trustees’ main objective is to support new work.  Given The Elephant Trust’s modest resources, grants have usually been limited to £2,000, but with the recent addition of the Shelagh Wakely Bequest some larger grants of up to £5,000 may be awarded. Priority is given to artists in the fine arts and small organisations and galleries who should submit well argued, imaginative proposals for making or producing new work or exhibitions.   RBS Bursaries (Royal Society of British Sculptors awards) website  http://www.rbs.org.uk/opportunities   email  Projects@rbs.org.uk   email  info@rbs.org.uk   fax  020 7370 3721   address  Royal Society of British Sculptors, 108 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RA   telephone  020 7373 5554 Ten Bursaries awarded each year to sculptors of outstanding talent and potential. They welcome applications from artists of any age and nationality, with or without formal training, who are at the beginning of their practice. The 10 winners will participate in a curated exhibition at the RBS Gallery and will enjoy all the benefits of RBS membership for two years.   Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) website  http://www.ahrc.ac.uk   email  a.henry@ahrc.ac.uk   fax  0117 987 6600   telephone  0117 987 6500   address  Whitefriars, Lewins Mead, Bristol BS1 2AE AHRC have a range of programmes supporting top-quality research and postgraduate training in the arts and humanities. From around 1500 applications to their seven Research schemes they make around 550-600 awards. From around 5500 applications to their Postgraduate schemes for funding people in Higher education they make around 1500 awards.   St Hugh's Foundation contact  sthughscharity@tiscali.co.uk   email  sthughscharity@tiscali.co.uk   website  http://www.sthughsfoundation.co.uk/programme.htm Encouraging research and development in the arts by enabling applicants from Lincolnshire / Humberside to make their own impact regionally, nationally or internationally through new work in any of the art forms.   Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Art Grant address  Central Library, Phillimore Walk, London, W8 7RX   contact  Janice Thorpe   contact  Janice.thorpe@rbkc.gov.uk   telephone  0207 361 3844   email  Janice.thorpe@rbkc.gov.uk   website  http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/leisureandlibraries/culture/artsservices/artsgrantsscheme.aspx The Arts Grants scheme is for arts activities or projects (by organisations or individuals) which are undertaken within the boundaries of the Royal Borough and demonstrate that they meet at least two of its strategic objectives. Also offer free funding surgeries. Deadlines three times a year, in 2010 * 5pm, Friday 21 May 2010, by 5pm, Friday 24 September 2010, by 5pm, Friday 21 January 2011   Lisa Ullmann Travelling Scholarship Fund address  LUTSF, Breach, Kilmington, Axminster, Devon EX13 7ST   contact  jachapman@breachdevon.co.uk   email  jachapman@breachdevon.co.uk   website  http://www.lutsf.org.uk The aim of this small charity is to provide financial support to individuals who wish to travel abroad or in the United Kingdom to attend a conference, to pursue a research project or undertake a short course of study in the field of movement or dance. Applications are welcomed irrespective of age, nationality or previous training.   Arts Council England - London website  http://www.artscouncil.org.uk   telephone  0845 300 6200   address  14 Great Peter Street, London SW1P 3NQ Arts Council England supplies funding through it's Grants programme.  Eligible projects include research and development, travel, networking events and independent projects promoting critical debate on the production and presentation of contemporary visual art. The Jerwood Foundation website  http://www.jerwoodvisualarts.org   website  http://www.jerwood.org   telephone  020 7654 0171   email  info@jerwood.org   address  Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN Awards include the Jerwood Painting Prize, Drawing Prize, Makers Award and Moving Media Awards in addition to commissions and grants to artists.   The Leverhulme Trust address  1 Pemberton Row, London EC4A 3BG   website  http://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/funding/AIR/AIR.cfm The Leverhulme Trust provides funding for research projects, fellowships, studentships, residencies, bursaries and prizes; it operates across all the academic disciplines, the ambition being to support talented individuals as they realise their personal vision in research and professional training. They also will support the residency of an artist of any kind in an institution of higher education or a museum in the UK in order to foster a creative collaboration between the artist and the staff and/or students of that institution.   Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowships website  http://www.wcmt.org.uk   email  office@wcmt.org.uk   address  Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, 29 Great Smith Street (South Door), London SW1P 3BL All British Citizens are eligible for the annual awards which are to enable applicants to acquire knowledge and experience abroad. Churchill Fellows can be of any age / occupation and each individual application is judged on its worth and merit. Successful applicants receive a grant to cover Fellowship expenses including return air fare, daily living, insurance and travel.  Grants usually cover a stay of 4-8 weeks.   Cass Sculpture Foundation address  Goodwood, nr. Chichester, West Sussex, PO18 0QP   email  info@sculpture.org.uk   website  http://www.sculpture.org.uk/ The Foundation is a charitable organisation which operates by way of a rigorous commissioning process. Approximately 20 new monumental works, predominantly by contemporary British sculptors, are produced annually. Once a work has been placed the Foundation splits the profit between the artist and the next commission. The Foundation's commissioning process is, in its initial stages, an organic process based upon dialogue between the Foundation and prospective artists. Check their website on how to submit your work.   Wellcome Trust Arts Awards address  Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE   telephone  020 7611 7222   email  arts@wellcome.ac.uk   website  http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/ Funding can be applied for at two levels: small to medium-sized projects (up to and including £30 000)and large projects (above £30 000).  The funding can be used for full or part production costs and is awarded to arts projects fostering public engagement with biomedical science.
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How To Approach Galleries

Just as the gallery has to know its clientele, an artist must know His or her audience, and that includes researching diligently everything about each gallery you wish to approach. Present your credentials-shows, awards and biographical material; then make certain your images look professionally prepared, whether in photographs, slides or digital form You Approach a Top Gallery Make sure you’ve achieved some professional success as an artist. In your portfolio, include information about your past one-person exhibitions, as well as lists of people and corporations that have bought your work. Have professional-quality digital images, photographs, transparencies or slides taken of your best work.

 

Most new artists think, art galleries do want to look at new artists’ artworks. But understandably most art galleries want to be able to do this on their terms, on their time schedule and in their own way How do I get my artwork into art galleries?  there is no set formula in how to approach an art gallery, but I can  guide you in your endeavours The major mistake that I see artists make is that they will be so desperate to get their work shown that they waste a lot of time approaching and making contact with the wrong art galleries. By this I mean, that the artist is soliciting any and all art galleries without first determining whether their art is compatible and in keeping with that gallery’s inventory. So it pays to do a certain amount of research on the targeted gallery prior to approaching them  The artist should objectively evaluate the gallery whether they are a good fit with their art, style, media, pricing why waste your time and also the gallery’s time trying to get an appointment when your work just doesn't fit the galleries style  Today, there is enough information online that will allow the artist to make a reasonable assessment on whether that gallery is a good prospect for your art.  Many times the gallery website will provide their submission policy or submission parameters and requirements. In some cases, they will say that they are not reviewing any portfolios at this time. This means that at this time, the gallery is satisfied with their current artists and that they are too busy to stop and review art portfolios. Please respect this and do not bother the gallery. However, if a gallery has not provided their submission policy publicly, then a short note or a concise email asking what their present submission policy will suffice. Many art galleries schedule a certain time of the year or a time of the month when they will review portfolios, as this is much easier and more efficient to review art portfolios at the same time. Again, an artist should follow their procedure and schedule exactly as it states. To do anything else, will risk the artist, for being remembered by the gallery for the wrong reasons! What to do when you have secured an appointment with a gallery Make sure that your biography, CV and artist statement are up to date. Have extra copies too. Have all images of your artwork prepared in several forms for the gallery to review. Make sure that you have extra copies of this work in order to be able to leave them at the gallery for further review. There is nothing worse for an artist to say to the gallery, that this is their only set and that they have to take it with them. Don’t do it. Make sure that the images of your artwork is professionally presentable. use  professional photographer experienced in photographing fine art yes it can be expensive but it will pay off in the long run  Act professionally. Think of this gallery appointment as you would if you were applying for a job and the employer was interviewing you. The gallery will have questions about your background, experience and your art. Conversely, you should be prepared to discuss how they conduct their gallery business and if you were to be selected, how could their arrangements help to sell your art? Be patient be  prepared to wait, for a decision on their behalf about taking you on as a gallery artist. In many cases, art galleries are working a year or two out with the scheduling of their shows and exhibitions. So be prepared to wait and be patient. But Conversely, be prepared to act quickly The best ways to meet gallery directors/owners to discuss your art is through the introduction by other artists who have shown their art at the gallery. This approach is much better than a “cold call” and it is also a form of a “third party endorsement of your work. This is another reason why it is important to network and be a part of local art organizations Think locally and branch out from there. Get known locally prior to approaching art galleries in larger cities. Try to get into local galleries through art competitions and art shows, and then build upon that success into regional, state and nationa gallieries.

How to market & Sell your artwork on social Networking sites

How to Start

First thing to understand the chances of getting rich are very slim "Starving Artist" comes to mind  but its possible. You will need a e-mail address to get visit the most frequently used social networking sites. With more than 150 million members worldwide, Facebook is a premier spot where artists and other creative people promote there work. MySpace, Flickr is a photo-hosting site that many artists. All of the sites allow you to post the latest news about your life and work, share photos and keep in touch with your ever-growing circle of  potential purchasers LinkedIn is  the most business oriented of all the social-networking sites and a good place to meet other professionals in a similar field. Twitter is a growing online network focused around micro blogging  quick update service where users are limited number of characters per update. First Create a winning profile make your profile comprehensive & Sing Provide links to more information about yourself, website, art-related awards you’ve received, your blog,  galleries of your work, galleries that feature your work, and articles written about you. In addition to providing loads of links, to make your pitch about your artistic passion .”Upload  lots of examples of your best work. Let people get a clear idea of your work within the social networking site itself. Creating a portfolio of available artwork including details and prices. Letting visitors know how to purchase your work  such as ecwid  Fineartamerica etc,, which provided Shopping widgets that can be installed into your social media and websites are essential to turning passive visitors into active buyers. Build your Network build up your list of contacts LinkedIn, MySpace, Facebook, Flickr and even Twitter (to a lesser extent) all have well-defined groups you can join, where like-minded people exchange views and ideas .  Host an online events Want to create your own online art event? In Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace, you can easily create an event and then promote the happening to your network of friends, family, potential clients and anyone else who would be interested. Promote your events let people know about upcoming, open studios & exhibitions Social media literacy is an essential skill for all artists to master.being able to effectively use social media to self-promote and create a lasting, active community that will continue to support you.When using any social media tool, there some important rules to follow:  Don’t lead with tools, lead with relationships. You aren’t going to get anywhere by blindly twittering promotional material 20 times a day.  In fact, that’s probably a pretty good way to annoy your fans.  Instead of looking at these tools as a platform solely for spewing content, think of them as a way to get involved in the conversation of your community. Use tools as an aide to build community. When you are an artist, community is everything.  It is your bread and butter and if your fans are not strong and loyal, you will not survive.  You do not have to be a household name to be successful if you have a strong community. Tell your story. You want to use social media to connect and engage with your audience on a personal level. People remember stories, so why not tell yours?  And I don’t mean a stale bio that you find on all these artists’ websites.  I mean something personal, written by you, about you, that readers will want to tell other people.  One interesting and memorable anecdote or fact makes it easier for your fans to promote you.  Create an incentive for users to come back. Make your fans feel special and give them something they can’t get anywhere else. . Building community, making a personal connection, and actively engaging your audience is not only important, it is necessary to set yourself apart from everybody else. Be authentic and be yours

How to market & Sell your artwork on social Networking sites

How to Start

You will need a e-mail address to get visit the most frequently used social networking sites. With more than 150 million members worldwide, Facebook is a premier spot where artists and other creative people promote there work. MySpace, Flickr is a photo-hosting site that many artists. All of the sites allow you to post the latest news about your life and work, share photos and keep in touch with your ever-growing circle of  potential purchasers LinkedIn is  the most business oriented of all the social-networking sites and a good place to meet other professionals in a similar field. Twitter is a growing online network focused around micro blogging  quick update service where users are limited number of characters per update. First Create a winning profile make your profile comprehensive & Sing Provide links to more information about yourself, website, art-related awards you’ve received, your blog,  galleries of your work, galleries that feature your work, and articles written about you. In addition to providing loads of links, to make your pitch about your artistic passion .”Upload  lots of examples of your best work. Let people get a clear idea of your work within the social networking site itself. Creating a portfolio of available artwork including details and prices. Letting visitors know how to purchase your work such as a ECWID, Fine art America which provided Shopping widgets that can be installed into your social media and websites are essential to turning passive visitors into active buyers. Build your Network build up your list of contacts LinkedIn, MySpace, Facebook, Flickr and even Twitter (to a lesser extent) all have well-defined groups you can join, where like-minded people exchange views and ideas .  Host an online events Want to create your own online art event? In Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace, you can easily create an event and then promote the happening to your network of friends, family, potential clients and anyone else who would be interested. Promote your events let people know about upcoming, open studios & exhibitions Social media literacy is an essential skill for all artists to master.being able to effectively use social media to self-promote and create a lasting, active community that will continue to support you.When using any social media tool, there some important rules to follow:  Don’t lead with tools, lead with relationships. You aren’t going to get anywhere by blindly twittering promotional material 20 times a day.  In fact, that’s probably a pretty good way to annoy your fans.  Instead of looking at these tools as a platform solely for spewing content, think of them as a way to get involved in the conversation of your community. Use tools as an aide to build community. When you are an artist, community is everything.  It is your bread and butter and if your fans are not strong and loyal, you will not survive.  You do not have to be a household name to be successful if you have a strong community. Tell your story. You want to use social media to connect and engage with your audience on a personal level. People remember stories, so why not tell yours?  And I don’t mean a stale bio that you find on all these artists’ websites.  I mean something personal, written by you, about you, that readers will want to tell other people.  One interesting and memorable anecdote or fact makes it easier for your fans to promote you.  Create an incentive for users to come back. Make your fans feel special and give them something they can’t get anywhere else. . Building community, making a personal connection, and actively engaging your audience is not only important, it is necessary to set yourself apart from everybody else. Be authentic and be yourself.

How to Apply for Art and Artist Grants,

Information of grants may change overtime.Generating funding for art is always challenging,  The good news is that the art world is one place where anyone who shows talent and promise, marketable or otherwise, can get help in a variety of ways including cash grants, residencies, employment or internships, allowances, free or low-cost studio space, art supplies, exhibition space, and so on. Receiving these types of assistance is not easy; application processes can be rigorous and competition is often intense. So in the interest of giving you a bit of an edge in situations where you're contending for a bequest, here's a brief tutorial on realize your dreams.  To begin with, be clear and focused about your intentions and goals,   Assuming you've got your agenda together and have identified potential opportunities, the most important part of any request for assistance is the application process. For starters, read the instructions thoroughly is it critical to understand and complete all forms according to instructions, Be aware that you can sometimes apply for a grant or other form of assistance based only on an idea. In fact, certain organizations prefer funding innovative concepts for producing art that does not yet exist rather than supporting art that already exists, but at the same time, they still require that whatever you propose to do be either based on or supported by the merits of previous work. In general, an organization financing an idea has to have trust in the artist based on some sort of established track record of accomplishments, which in addition to completed work, may include a resume, list of shows or exhibitions, previous awards or grants, and so on-- assuming they're relevant to whatever is being applied for.  filling out the application itself, spelling, neatness, good grammar, following word count requirements, and thoroughness are all important  here are a few funding organisations: The Elephant Trust address  512 Bankside Lofts, 65 Hopton Street London SE1 9GZ   contact  Ruth Rattenbury   email  ruth@elephanttrust.org.uk   website  http://www.elephanttrust.org.uk The Trust was set up in 1975 to make it possible for artists and those presenting their work to undertake and complete projects when frustrated by lack of funds. It is committed to helping artists and art institutions/galleries that depart from the routine and signal new, distinct and imaginative sets of possibilities. The Trustees’ main objective is to support new work.  Given The Elephant Trust’s modest resources, grants have usually been limited to £2,000, but with the recent addition of the Shelagh Wakely Bequest some larger grants of up to £5,000 may be awarded. Priority is given to artists in the fine arts and small organisations and galleries who should submit well argued, imaginative proposals for making or producing new work or exhibitions.   RBS Bursaries (Royal Society of British Sculptors awards) website  http://www.rbs.org.uk/opportunities   email  Projects@rbs.org.uk   email  info@rbs.org.uk   fax  020 7370 3721   address  Royal Society of British Sculptors, 108 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RA   telephone  020 7373 5554 Ten Bursaries awarded each year to sculptors of outstanding talent and potential. They welcome applications from artists of any age and nationality, with or without formal training, who are at the beginning of their practice. The 10 winners will participate in a curated exhibition at the RBS Gallery and will enjoy all the benefits of RBS membership for two years.   Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) website  http://www.ahrc.ac.uk   email  a.henry@ahrc.ac.uk   fax  0117 987 6600   telephone  0117 987 6500   address  Whitefriars, Lewins Mead, Bristol BS1 2AE AHRC have a range of programmes supporting top-quality research and postgraduate training in the arts and humanities. From around 1500 applications to their seven Research schemes they make around 550-600 awards. From around 5500 applications to their Postgraduate schemes for funding people in Higher education they make around 1500 awards.   St Hugh's Foundation contact  sthughscharity@tiscali.co.uk   email  sthughscharity@tiscali.co.uk   website  http://www.sthughsfoundation.co.uk/programme.htm Encouraging research and development in the arts by enabling applicants from Lincolnshire / Humberside to make their own impact regionally, nationally or internationally through new work in any of the art forms.   Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Art Grant address  Central Library, Phillimore Walk, London, W8 7RX   contact  Janice Thorpe   contact  Janice.thorpe@rbkc.gov.uk   telephone  0207 361 3844   email  Janice.thorpe@rbkc.gov.uk   website  http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/leisureandlibraries/culture/artsservices/artsgrantsscheme.aspx The Arts Grants scheme is for arts activities or projects (by organisations or individuals) which are undertaken within the boundaries of the Royal Borough and demonstrate that they meet at least two of its strategic objectives. Also offer free funding surgeries. Deadlines three times a year, in 2010 * 5pm, Friday 21 May 2010, by 5pm, Friday 24 September 2010, by 5pm, Friday 21 January 2011   Lisa Ullmann Travelling Scholarship Fund address  LUTSF, Breach, Kilmington, Axminster, Devon EX13 7ST   contact  jachapman@breachdevon.co.uk   email  jachapman@breachdevon.co.uk   website  http://www.lutsf.org.uk The aim of this small charity is to provide financial support to individuals who wish to travel abroad or in the United Kingdom to attend a conference, to pursue a research project or undertake a short course of study in the field of movement or dance. Applications are welcomed irrespective of age, nationality or previous training.   Arts Council England - London website  http://www.artscouncil.org.uk   telephone  0845 300 6200   address  14 Great Peter Street, London SW1P 3NQ Arts Council England supplies funding through it's Grants programme.  Eligible projects include research and development, travel, networking events and independent projects promoting critical debate on the production and presentation of contemporary visual art. The Jerwood Foundation website  http://www.jerwoodvisualarts.org   website  http://www.jerwood.org   telephone  020 7654 0171   email  info@jerwood.org   address  Jerwood Space, 171 Union Street, London SE1 0LN Awards include the Jerwood Painting Prize, Drawing Prize, Makers Award and Moving Media Awards in addition to commissions and grants to artists.   The Leverhulme Trust address  1 Pemberton Row, London EC4A 3BG   website  http://www.leverhulme.ac.uk/funding/AIR/AIR.cfm The Leverhulme Trust provides funding for research projects, fellowships, studentships, residencies, bursaries and prizes; it operates across all the academic disciplines, the ambition being to support talented individuals as they realise their personal vision in research and professional training. They also will support the residency of an artist of any kind in an institution of higher education or a museum in the UK in order to foster a creative collaboration between the artist and the staff and/or students of that institution.   Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowships website  http://www.wcmt.org.uk   email  office@wcmt.org.uk   address  Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, 29 Great Smith Street (South Door), London SW1P 3BL All British Citizens are eligible for the annual awards which are to enable applicants to acquire knowledge and experience abroad. Churchill Fellows can be of any age / occupation and each individual application is judged on its worth and merit. Successful applicants receive a grant to cover Fellowship expenses including return air fare, daily living, insurance and travel.  Grants usually cover a stay of 4-8 weeks.   Cass Sculpture Foundation address  Goodwood, nr. Chichester, West Sussex, PO18 0QP   email  info@sculpture.org.uk   website  http://www.sculpture.org.uk/ The Foundation is a charitable organisation which operates by way of a rigorous commissioning process. Approximately 20 new monumental works, predominantly by contemporary British sculptors, are produced annually. Once a work has been placed the Foundation splits the profit between the artist and the next commission. The Foundation's commissioning process is, in its initial stages, an organic process based upon dialogue between the Foundation and prospective artists. Check their website on how to submit your work.   Wellcome Trust Arts Awards address  Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE   telephone  020 7611 7222   email  arts@wellcome.ac.uk   website  http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/ Funding can be applied for at two levels: small to medium-sized projects (up to and including £30 000)and large projects (above £30 000).  The funding can be used for full or part production costs and is awarded to arts projects fostering public engagement with biomedical science./expander_maker]